Fence Cleaning

Advice on cleaning fences

Regular fence cleaning keeps your home and yard looking their best, and it also helps to extend the life of your fencing and get rid of any pests which may have infested the material. Proper fence cleaning techniques depend upon what type of material your fencing is made from, and it's very important that you use material-specific strategies in order to avoid damaging your fence and ensuring you get the kind of results you're after.

Techniques for Cleaning Various Fences

The four most common materials fences are made from are wrought iron, wood, vinyl and composites. Here is an overview of what's involved in the proper cleaning of each type of fence:

  • Cleaning a wrought iron fence: This is the most intensive type of fence cleaning, as wrought iron is subject to rust and corrosion as well as dirt and grime. If the dirt doesn't wash off easily, or if you're dealing with rust, you may need to lightly sand down the wrought iron and touch it up with paint once you're finished.
  • Cleaning a vinyl fence: Vinyl is a fairly easy material to clean; simply combine liquid dish or laundry detergent with water and scrub the vinyl surface clean with a soft sponge or chamois.
  • Cleaning a wood fence: Pressure washing, either with water alone or with a water-detergent solution, is the easiest and fastest wood fence cleaning method.
  • Cleaning a composite fence: To clean a composite fence, combine detergent with warm water, apply it with a sponge and rinse it clean with a garden hose. Be careful when using pressure washers on composites, because if you apply too much pressure, you may blast away the fragile finish.

Professional Fence Cleaning Services

Investing in the services of a professional guarantees results, so if your fence is heavily soiled, or if you'd prefer to entrust the job to someone with more experience, hiring a fence cleaning service is a good idea. Most fence cleanings are very affordable and can be performed in the matter of a few hours, though iron fence cleaning can be more intensive and expensive because of the extra care required. As with any type of contracted service, always gather quotes from multiple companies and choose the professional offering the optimal combination of price, convenience, experience and trustworthiness.

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There is so much Oracle-related information to keep up with that I often appeacirte someone saying - 'Do you know you can do x in 10g?'Well, maybe Doug and I need to discuss this elsewhere, because I don't want to hijack someone else's blog... but what Doug's talking about there is not a 1 minute tip. He's talking about being pointed in the right direction for further research. There's a difference: a tip claims to encapsulate a "truth" within itself. General guidance to investigate X, Y or Z isn't a "tip" in that league.Case in point: I didn't know only lower-version RMAN executables can be run against a higher version of the database. (That is, 10gR1 RMAN can backup a 10gR2 database, but 10gR2 RMAN cannot backup a 10gR1 database). I should have known it, because it's not new. But I asked on the Dizwell Forum, and got a one-word answer. Not even a 1-minute answer, mind! Just one word... a word which was a Metalink document number, and thus all the insight on the matter you could ask for was contained within that one word.But that doesn't make '76337.1' (or whatever) a tip, does it? It makes it a correction, a note pointing out my error, a reference to a store of knowledge. But a little "nugget" of tip-like information. Nah.And the same goes for someone telling you feature A, B and C should be looked into. I'm all for that. Looking into things is what proper research is all about, after all. But I am completely against the idea that you can 'nuggetise' what feature A is all about, let alone how to employ it, in a one-minute brain fart.Same problems with Arup's example. if you sit there thinking that setting AUDIT_TRAIL=DB switches on auditing, you don't understand auditing. If you understood it, you wouldn't be surprised that setting audit options has to come into the picture. Which is not to say a reminder of these things isn't useful to those of us prone to forget stuff, but again: you can't miss out the issue of intent here. If your intent is to jog memories, then brain-fart away! All very useful, no doubt. But if your intent is to try and encapsulate a nugget of knowledge, and to impart that knowledge to others for the first time, then stop it immediately, because that's not a good thing to be doing (IMHO, of course).There's a very fine dividing line between 1 minute nuggets and 'silver bullets', and I've had enough of the latter and those who dispense them to last me a lifetime!
Posted on 10/19/2013 2:15:00 AM by Anonymous
Thanks. It's fun trying to firuge out how to shoot something to make it interesting to others. Doesn't always work out, but you learn from your mistakes, hopefully.
Posted on 9/19/2013 6:30:00 AM by Anonymous